Offstage | Seafret

Wednesday, January 27, 2016 0 Comments A+ a-

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Have you ever had something you cannot wait to share with everyone so good it is? That kind which makes you text your best friend in the middle of the night? This is how I've been feeling over the last two weeks. Friday 29th can't come soon enough. I've had the privilege of listening to Seafret's debut album Tell Me It's Real - for days & on repeat! - ahead of its release and just want to be able to tell everyone I know "you have to check this out, it's the best album I've came across in the past few years". Because it simply is. And Jack and Harry are probably two of the nicest lads in music at the moment. Perfect combo. I'm so pleased they've took their time to share with us their thoughts...

Ps: Check Play On for the full review pretty soon.

♯ When did music become a part of your lives? What's your first memory music related?

Jack: Music's always been in our lives and we've our parents to thank for that. We were both exposed to a wide range of music growing up, I heard artists like Tom Waites, Radiohead, Elvis Presley, Michael Jackson and lots more obscure things I didn't know the name of. My first memory of music is having a tape cassette of Michael Jackson's They Don't Really Care About Us. I used to listen to it with headphones on repeat in my bedroom. I think I was around seven years old. 

Harry: Music has always been a massive part of my life. My dad has been in bands all of his life, so I guess it was always going to happen for me eventually. The moment that I suddenly decided that music was what I wanted to do was when I heard John Martyn on the radio. I was instantly addicted to the sound he created from his guitar and that made me want to give it a go. After that, I never looked back!

Jack and Harry rocking it during the New Faces Tour, read full review here. Photo by Zaira.

♯ What sounds have most influenced you?

Jack: Acoustic sounds grabbed my attention as soon as I discovered Bob Dylan, he really changed what music meant to me. I loved the fact that he could get a message across in a song and still tug at your heart strings without any dramatic production. Also, The White Stripes, they've changed what I looked for in music. Raw emotive power that's stripped back so the listener can tell where every sound is coming from. 

Harry: We're influenced and inspired by a massive range of music, old and new. I grew up on my dad's music collection, so from a young age listened to a lot of blues and bluegrass music. People like Doc Watson and Howling Wolf

♯ If you could pick anyone, dead or alive, who would you have liked to collaborate with and why? 

Jack: I'd love to work with Tom Waites or Jack White. They're both established and do their own thing. I think you have to be honest with music and that's what they're are best at. 

Harry: For me, it'd have to be John Martyn. He'd sure be able to show me a thing or two! He's my biggest influence as a guitarist so to be able to have met him would be a dream. 

♯ I know it is almost like choosing a favourite child, but... Which is your favourite song to play live and which one would you say is the most personal?

Jack: Tricky! Missing is the first track on the album and it's probably my favourite to play right now. It's got to be one of the most personal too. I remember writing it and thinking "are you ready to sing this?" I was writing about something that was still fresh and very personal to me in my life. I'm glad I did though, because it's honest and I love the music behind it.

Harry: Be There has got to be my favourite song to play live. It's a massive rock out moment for us in the set and a lot of fun to play. Our song that's the most personal to me is To The Sea. It's one of the first songs me and Jack wrote together and it's always stuck with us. 

♯ You left a few known songs from your previous EPs off of the coming album. How was the process of choosing which tracks to include?

Jack: Another difficult situation to be in, we've been writing since we met back home, we had a bunch of songs and had to decide which ones we wanted to use and in what order. Playing them back to back and over and over, we finally found how we wanted the album to run.

♯ You've recorded two covers, Drown and Angel of Small Death & The Codeine Scene. Why these songs and which other tracks would you like to cover in the future? 

Jack: We supported Hozier last year and have been fans of his music for a while now, so deciding to cover one of his tunes was an easy pick. As for the Drown cover, I'd say we wanted a challenge, we love this band and once we heard this track we wanted to have a go at it. Covers can be a good test of your musical ability and the best part of it is making it into something of your own. 

♯ When not making/playing music, what are you guys usually up to?

Harry: I'm always playing so I don't really have much time to do anything else. When we aren't in the van traveling from gig to gig we're at home or in the studio working on new ideas. I do like a good few pints in the boozer mind... 

♯ Have you ever considered any other career or has music been always the first and only choice?

Harry: I was 13 when I started playing guitar, so from then on that was all I wanted to do. I guess I never had a chance to think about doing anything else. 

♯ What's the best thing about being on stage?

Harry: Being together, getting lost in the music, delivering our songs to new faces and people who don't know who we are and winning them over, and to hear fans sing back at you. Even if you get one person at the end telling you they've absolutely loved it. That can be the most rewarding thing. Using the songs we've written together to make people feeling something for a moment. It's an incredible feeling to perform.

♯ You must have some epic stories from touring all around the country. Any fun memory you can share with us?

Jack: Touring as a whole is an amazing experience. The things you see, the people you meet, everything contributes to making each part of the tour that little bit different and that little bit more insane. We had a crazy night and ended up jamming on the spot with rapper Fat Man Scoop. That was a mental night!